Murder starts with your Mouth

The excellent book The Dark Side Of Man reports that David Luckenbill studied all of the murderers in a California county over a 10-year period and asked them why they killed their victims. All the death row inmates interviewed listed one of only two reasons for killing:

  • 34% said they killed because the victim challenged the killer’s authority
  • 66% said they killed because the victim insulted them in some way

What matters is the criminal’s perception. If he perceives a challenge or an insult, he is more likely to kill you.

This information provides a basis for planning a strategy for dealing with criminal violence.

Understand that the criminal is not operating under the same moral imperatives as his victim. A large proportion of violent criminals are psychopaths without any empathy for their victims. Never think, “He won’t shoot me because I wouldn’t shoot him in the same situation.” You would be wrong and this will cost you your life.

False bravado will also get you killed. Criminals learn to quickly judge people and use that judgement to manipulate them. Your bluff will be transparent and you will experience a violent response to your challenge.

Never insult an attacker. There is a big difference between screaming “GET AWAY FROM ME!” and screaming “GET AWAY FROM ME YOU MOTHERFUCKER!” Insulting an armed criminal will not yield positive results.

Be especially cautious during the times when the criminal is under the most stress and be chose your words carefully, especially at the early and end stages of the attack.

Develop a verbal response for the most likely scenarios you may face rather than thinking on the fly, just say exactly what you have practiced. Your script should avoid any challenging language or insults. Deliver your script in a calm monotone even if you are planning violent resistance. Surprise is a very potent weapon in your arsenal.

If you are in an environment that exposes you or your staff to the risk of criminal attack, then The Dark Side Of Man is a book you must read.

Know your enemy and plan to prevail.

Normalcy Versus Risk

Feral Dogs

In the past I have written about the risks associated with feral dogs. Currently, the town of Kenora Ontario is experiencing some difficulties with feral dogs. Having a pack of feral dogs circling your house is not something to take lightly.

When Knives Attack

The recent Calgary mass murder illustrates how people assess risk wrongly. Statistics Canada reports (in 2008) that one-third of homicides and attempted murders involved edged weapons. That is more than any other type of weapon. StatsCan also reported that edged weapons were used against six per cent of victims of violent crime while firearms were used against two per cent of victims. Yet most people and organisations dither over plans for mass shootings.

Knives are easy to obtain, easy to conceal, they don’t run out of ammunition, and they cut in any direction. No training is required and if you can move your hand with the knife in your grasp, then you can kill with it.

This type of crime occurs quite often. Here is a recent sampling:

  • four people were stabbed in a Regina shopping mall
  • student was stabbed at a Brampton, Ontario, high school
  • four coworkers stabbed at a Toronto office by a man who was being fired
  • two people killed and four wounded in a Loblaw’s warehouse stabbing attack

Of course the knee-jerk reaction will be to ban assault knives. Of course all prohibitions fail miserably and probably make the situation worse as happened with the ‘war on drugs’ and ‘gun control’. Some foolish individuals will no doubt say that the StatsCan figures prove that ‘gun control’ works and we now need ‘knife control’, no doubt a knife registry will follow.

In the Calgary case, the accused probably took the knife from the kitchen and then started his rampage. I’m sure registering their kitchen knives after getting a licence to buy them would have stopped this attack.

Risk Assessment

Whether it’s feral dogs or knife attacks, you have to measure the relative probability of the event occurring against the consequences of the event. We are hard wired to believe that we live in a safe world–if we weren’t, then we would never have ventured out of our caves to create the world we now live in. This is called the normalcy bias.

Normalcy Bias Vs. Risk

I am paid to respond to situations where the normalcy bias got the better of someone or to plan for situations that nobody wants to contemplate. Decades of experience has taught me that nobody wants to contemplate the low probability, high consequence events.   Legislation and hand wringing won’t change this–planning, preparation, and training might. Unfortunately, the interest in preparation and training wanes quickly as memory of the event that spawned this dissipates, and thereby allowing the normalcy bias to reassert itself.

The Individual First Aid Kit (IFAK)

Recent involvement in investigations into industrial accidents and incidents involving security officers caused me to look into the state of first-aid training. I have some concerns that lessons-learned are not being applied as well as they should.

Recent wars have taught us how to teach personnel to control severe bleeding and maintain an airway under adverse situations. Unfortunately, from what I have seen, this hasn’t filtered down to industry in the form of better training and equipment.

This battlefield experience should be of interest security personnel at sites that might experience an active shooter or similarly catastrophic event. Those involved in emergency and business continuity planning should also take note of these lessons. My comments do not reflect the specific situation in any one Canadian province. I am aware of all the regulatory inertia, concerns about costs, and legal implications that inhibit change, but these are weak excuses for inaction when lives may be at risk. The injured person who is beading to death or suffocating doesn’t give a damn about laws and regulations–he simply does not want to die.

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Getting Out of Google

Google and other search engines are wonderful things for gathering information, we all know that, but what if people with evil intent are gathering information about you?

Getting out of Street View

Google Street View provides a great deal of data that can be used to plan an attack on a facility, a person, or to conduct a kidnapping. Google offers an easy, free, and effective way to restrict access to this data.

At a client’s home, I found that his car licence plate was legible. This usually occurs when the car is parked inside a garage or car port. At the client’s workplace, several security measures were clearly visible as were other features of the facility that raised concerns.

Google’s solution is to place an opaque digital wall around your house or facility. To get out of Google Street View, first search for the street address. Once the property is visible, you will find a small box at the bottom right of the image that says “Report a problem”. Click on this to select a reason for blurring the image of the property. I usually select Other: This image presents security concerns. Add some discriptive data to help Google identify the property and complete the CAPTCHA (an acronym for “Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart”) thing that takes me several tries to get right. In 2 or 3 days a blurred wall should appear around the property.

Hazardous Material

The Emergency Response Guidebook published jointly by the Canadian Department of Transportation, Mexican Transportation agencies, and the USDOT lets you identify the hazardous contents of pipelines, trucks, or trains from the placards on the side of the tanker, rail car, or pipeline. The guide lists specific hazards and evacuation distances for spills or fires. However, it doesn’t provide any spill/fire/explosion protocols.

If you are around hazardous materials and their transport conveyances then you need this guidebook.