WebMii

I have written about pipl.com before and often find it useful when I am trying to track-down people. Unfortunately, its usefulness is limited if the subject person lives outside the U.S.A..

When searching people outside the US, I turn to WebMii. This has data sets for specific countries which you can select or you can select all by selecting ‘International’  as the region.

You may also search by keywords to get a list of people associated with the keywords. However, this has never worked for anything I have searched. Searching by company or brand name often returns useful results, but selecting a region failed to change the results in any search that I have done.

What was the Weather Like?

Wolfram Alpha is an interesting answer engine. It answers questions by computing the answer from curated, structured data, rather than providing a list of web pages that contain the search words like normal search engines.

Investigations often hinge on local conditions such as weather. When I need to estimate the weather conditions or compare someone’s description of the weather to actual conditions, I type in a search term like “what was the weather in toronto on july 1, 1967”. Sometimes, Wolfram Alpha has no data from which to formulate an answer such as happened with this search. If you substitute the years 1950 or 2000 you get answers, but not for 1967.

Of course I verify what I get from Wolfram Alpha through official sources.

New Bing Image Search

Images that appear on a web site offer many insights into the people who created the site. They tell you if they have the money to buy copyrighted content, or that they took the time to create their own imagery to get across their message. The imagery may also tell you that they don’t respect copyright law. The use of the same image on several sites may indicate a relationship between the sites that use the image.

Bing now offers an image search facility that allows you to paste the specific image URL into the search box at Bing.com/images.  If you have a picture that you want to match, then you may upload it directly to Bing.com/Images and Bing will search for matches. To match an image, submit a URL, or upload an image, just click on image match.

When you come across an image on a site you find in the Bing Web results, go to Bing Image search and clear the search box. That will make the Image Match link appear next to the search box. When using this, the best approach is to have Bing Web open in one tab and Bing Images in another. As you click on Web results, they will open in a new tab between Bing Web and Bing Images. To isolate the images you wish to search, in Firefox, right click the image and click on view image. This will take you to the image itself and its unique URL. This makes it easier for Bing to isolate the image it is trying to match.

Exif Viewers

In a past article, I explained Exchangeable Image File or Exif data and pointed you to www.regex.info, an easy to use exif viewer with a geo-locator. The regex.info Exif viewer allows you to enter the image URL or to upload an image for analysis. It doesn’t require JavaScript and it doesn’t have any widgets.

Another easy to use online exif viewer may be found at www.fotoforensics.com, but you must enable JavaScript to use it. You can use the URL of the picture instead of uploading the image.

The online exif viewer at www.gbimg.org has a lot of widgets on it.

My last discovery was the Exif site at http://www.findpicturelocation.com. Just upload the picture and it will show the location where it was taken. It only works with .jpg or .tif files. You must upload the image to the site, so who knows where it might end-up. This uses the Google API for the mapping. Not all pictures have the GPS coordinates in them.

Google Free Wednesday—DDG Site Search Command

The DuckDuckGo (DDG) search engine aggregates content to provide search results while offering significant privacy features. My favorite search shortcut in DDG is its version of the Google site: command. Place an exclamation point before the site you want to search–for example, “private investigator” !facebook. The exclamation point directs the search to a specific site. In this case, you will have to login to your Facebook account to see the results.

The End of Dialog

The database aggregator, Dialog, is no more. It was consumed by ProQuest to become ProQuest Dialog. The resulting product has become completely useless to us for due diligence and corporate research.

The Standard & Poor’s and Corporate Affiliation databases are gone along with several others that we relied upon to create a basic profile of a company’s structure and operations. Alternatives exist, but none are as convenient as the old Dialog.

Training for Investigative Internet Research (IIR)

IIR is a very competitive sport. If you don’t find the needed data, then the opposition wins.

Now you might ask, “how does one train for the ongoing IIR competition?” My answer to this question comes in two parts.

First, read about IIR and read the manuals for the software that you use to produce your end product. You must learn about sources and the methods used to produce a report that is fit for decision-making.

Second, one must practice using these sources and methods.

You can get a sound grasp of the first requirement from my book, Sources and Methods for Investigative Internet Research and this and other blogs, and I will share some secrets about the second requirement right now.

Practice finding more details about obscure news items that you see on TV or Twitter. You must collect the full story, write the story in report format, and preserve all the supporting material. Time yourself for completing the overall task. Also time your wasted effort. It is important to do both if you want to improve your performance. You can also set a time limit for the task using a countdown timer like XNote Stopwatch. For a timer that allows you to log wasted time, you can use Time Stamp.

Consider the following training exercise; there is a news item about a Spitz dog found near death on a trash heap in California during the week of 9 Dec 13. I knew the dog was a Spitz from the TV news item and I also knew the approximate date from the date of the news item. My training task was to get the basic 5 W’s on paper in twenty minutes. Could you do the same thing? If not, then here’s how.

I had the basic when and where—only in a vague sense. I know that search engines are not very good at handling calendar dates. I know my basic search statement will be dog trash California and I am certain they won’t report the breed accurately. That leaves me with the date, search statement, and as it was a TV news items there will be images and video. Where do I start to get it done in twenty minutes?

I know that only Google handles calendar dates in a usable manner and that it has excellent news content. I should also search Bing, Yahoo!, DDG, and Devilfinder. Time is not on my side.

I set-up a OneNote notebook with two tabs. One for research material collected from the web and one for the 5 W’s. Under the 5 W’s tab, I create a sub page for each W. I will use the 5 W’s material to create my report in Word as I would any other report.

Fagan Finder to the rescue. It organises search engines into useable groups and gives you an easy to use interface, such as the Google Ultimate Interface and Google Search By Date Interface.

For the search term, dog trash California, Google had excellent results and Bing had poor results, as did DDG and Yahoo!. The problem was that there were two similar stories one involving a poodle and one that was the subject of this exercise. Google eliminated the poodle stories when searched by date. Devilfinder produced excellent results as well.

From Devilfinder, along with the Google Ultimate Interface and Google Search By Date Interface I was able to provide all the W’s and complete a short reporting memo in twenty minutes while maintaining the proper citations and source material in OneNote.

Train hard.

Getting Advance Knowledge of New Products

Companies operating in the U.S. often file ‘Intent-To-Use’ applications for trademarks and thereby disclose the names and descriptions of forthcoming products and services six months before the product launch. Extensions of up to two years are sometimes granted if the launch process becomes bogged down.

Searching the Trademark Electronic Search System (TESS) of the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office will find the ‘Intent-To-Use’ applications.

LeftistAgendaPedia

People who don’t believe everything they read often refer to Wikipedia as the LeftistAgendaPedia with good reason. Fifteen U.S. universities are offering college credit to students who will inject feminist thinking into the Wikipedia. They call this Wikistorming.

Theoretically, the large number of contributors and editors should make Wikipedia an accurate, objective, and self-correcting encyclopedia. But what happens when an influential group of contributors and editors with an Leftist ideological agenda start an orchestrated effort to WikiLawyer the site rules? The answer of course is that you end-up with the LeftistAgendaPedia.

Beware of the bias in anything in the LeftistAgendaPedia (Wikipedia)!