When things get complex

Advangle helps you build complex web-search queries in Google and Bing.

You can quickly build a query with multiple parameters (such as the ‘domain’, ‘language’ or ‘date published’) and immediately see the result of this query in Google or Bing search engines. Any condition in a query can be temporarily disabled without removing it to allow you to try several combinations of different conditions and choose the one that works best.

A reddit Barometer

Reddit is an entertainment, social networking, and news website where registered users submit content, such as text posts or direct links. This makes it a large online bulletin board.

Users vote submissions up or down to organize the posts and determine their position on the site’s pages. Content is organized by areas of interest called “subreddits”. The subreddit topics include news, gaming, movies, music, books, fitness, food, and photosharing, among many others.

For the investigator, reddit is a good barometer of the user’s interests, attitudes, and popularity. If you want to see the user’s barometer, SnoopSnoo provides reddit user and subreddits analytics.

On SnoopSnoo, the user analytics are computed by analyzing submissions and comments activity. Analysis is limited to the 1,000 most recent comments and submissions due to reddit’s API restrictions. The subreddits are automatically assigned topics by an algorithm. Subreddits with fewer than 1,000 subscribers or created within the last 30 days may not have been processed.

Searching Periscope & Meerkat

Periscope, the free iPhone app from Twitter is the clear winner against first-comer Meerkat. Periscope is mobile live streaming that lets the user share what is happening right now and relive it later thanks to the service’s saved streams feature.

At the moment, from the investigator’s perspective, Periscope and Meerkat offer an opportunity to see a lot of useless streaming video if you don’t know how to search effectively. Both are hard to search by keyword or topic–you usually have to search via people.

You can use Getxplore and link your Twitter account to them. This will then allow you to see current Periscope and Meerkat streams and then enter search quires to find the types of streams that you are looking for.

Another option is the Twitter search and programs such as Tweet Deck or Hootsuite which you can setup to constantly pull Periscope and Meerkat streams direct to you dashboard. Simply add #Periscope OR #Meerkat as a search term and now you will have access to every single live-streaming video that is shared to Twitter.

You can refine the search by geography as in  #periscope OR #Meerkat near:”Toronto, Ontario” within:50mi. To further filter results add keywords to make the search even more specific, (#periscope OR #Meerkat) AND (Jays OR Skydome).

Search Engines are NOT Neutral

If you believe that the search results from any search engine, let alone Google, are neutral and do not reflect the search engine’s owners interests and biases, then you are very niave or entirely delusional. To prosper in the ‘information age’ one must be skeptical, open minded, and use many search engines.

For example, Google monitors what we’re searching on and decides what search results are best for its own interests. In the USA, Google was the second-largest contributor to Obama, but Google protests that it doesn’t manipulate search results in his, and the democrat’s favour.

Some very enlightening information is now comming to light about how a small change the search algorithm may dramatically change the outcome of an election. I strongly suggest that you read Big Data Meets Popular Vote in today’s National Post.

Google-Free Wednesday–Disconnect Search

Disconnect Search is a specialized VPN that lets you search privately using Google, Bing, and Yahoo search engines. They say they don’t log searches, IP addresses, or any other personal info.

Using Disconnect search, your ISP shouldn’t see your search terms as they don’t have access to your searches. Normally, when you click a result link, the site you go to may see your search terms, but Disconnect should prevent this. Search engines save your searches, which can be connected to your real name or IP address. Disconnect should anonymize your searches.

OPSEC & Social Network Sites


An investigator can use LinkedIn, Facebook, and other sites to build a profile of someone’s personal and work life, but like so many things in life, this is both good and bad. What might happen if it is done to your business’s employees? How might this hurt your company? Most businesses do not think about this and if they do, they usually consider key executives to be most at risk. This is entirely wrong!

Operational security (OPSEC) is the lens through which to view this risk. View each employee in terms of what he knows and to what he has access. This will change your entire outlook.

The janitor has keys and is in the building alone. Security guards possess sensitive information. The secretary to the VP of Marketing knows when you will launch a new product. Are you starting to get the picture? This leaves the problem of how to analyse the content of sites like LinkedIn and Facebook.


For example, Facebook identifies your friends and family, and where they live. It knows your likes and dislikes. It knows your travel destinations. It knows posting habits and posts to which you will respond. All of this creates an OPSEC nightmare.

The Wolfram Alpha Facebook Report lets you see what information Facebook knows about you and your friends. It yields easy-to-understand charts, tables, and graphs in a personalized report.

This needs the account holder to log into Facebook before it will run, however, this will not stop an industrial spy, foreign agent, gangster, or terrorist. In certain dark corners of the Internet, hacking a social media account will cost about $350. Changing the privacy settings is a meagre deterrent. With the hacked account and the Wolfram Alpha Facebook Report, the crook or spy has everything he needs to plan the compromise of an employee.

LinkedIn & Spies

Using LinkedIn, researchers found the personal details of 27,000 intelligence officers that the researchers say are working on surveillance programs. They compiled the records into the ICWatch database, which is searchable by company, title, name, and location.

What might a skilled researcher find regarding your employees?


The biggest part of dealing with this OPSEC risk is recognising that it exists. The rest of the solution involves a combination of strict social media policies, non-disclosure agreements, conditions of employment, and employment contracts coupled with employee indoctrination and training.

How to Hide Your Searches from Google

Are you uncomfortable with how much Google knows about you? Google makes a lot of money mining your search history. A Boston-based privacy company Abine has a solution to this problem.

The Blur Private Search service prevents Google from linking a search query to you. Search results appear normally, except your search, IP address, and the links that you click on can’t be identified or connected to you by the search engine. It is easy to set-up and use—you don’t have to sign-up using Gmail or other service. Create an account using a throw-away email address.

Nothing is perfect. Private Search only works with Firefox because Chrome tells Google about everything you do all by itself. It won’t protect you from other search engines like Bing or Yahoo.


Do you want a search engine that does the following:

  • doesn’t keep details on what you are searching for
  • doesn’t store your IP address
  • doesn’t use cookies
  • doesn’t track you
  • doesn’t send your search term to the site you clicked on
  • doesn’t store or share your search history
  • doesn’t share your personal information
  • doesn’t have servers in the U.S.A.
  • doesn’t hide the search results amongst a deluge of ads

Try Motherpipe. It operates privacy oriented search engines at motherpipe.com, motherpipe.co.uk, motherpipe.de and motherpipe.se that don’t do things I don’t want done.

It gets its data from Yahoo!Bing. It offers the search operators “site:” and Boolean operators “AND” and “OR“. It also searches Twitter anonymously.

Forgotten But Not Gone

The European Union “right to be forgotten” law that allows individuals to demand the removal of links from Google’s EU search sites is starting to come into play.

The EU “Right to be Forgotten” is clearly a form of censorship in the 28 member nations and 4 other European countries that encompasses over 500 million people. Google has 90% of the search engine market there.

Demanding the removal of an indexed item only renews interest in the story. As the law only applies to Google and not the pages themselves or other search engines, traffic to the articles in question increases thanks to journalists calling attention to them once they receive notification that the article was removed from the EU sites. This is known as The Streisand Effect.

European Google search results for any name display the disclaimer that, “Some results may have been removed under data protection law in Europe,” even if nobody requested the removal of anything.

Of course, people will soon tire of writing about the removed articles and people will stop demanding the removal of indexed items.

Certainly, a free speech enthusiasts will start to collate all the missing search results and make them available. This has already started with Hidden From Google. This site archives articles that Google must remove from European Union search results. I’m certain a Twitter account like @gdnvanished will also appear to provide similar content.

The easiest way to circumvent this censorship is to search using the Google.com site instead of the local EU search sites—or better yet, use other search engines like DuckDuckGo, Yandex, and blekko.

Searching Google Anonymously While Signed In

I know you still want to use Google without giving away all your personal data. To accomplish this while using Firefox, use the Searchonymous extension. With this, you can stay signed into your Google account while searching and Google won’t know it’s you doing the search. It also gets rid of most of the annoying ads.

If you use Chrome or a browser like Comodo Dragon that is based on Chrome, then you might try Search Disconnect which purports to do the same thing.


I have written about pipl.com before and often find it useful when I am trying to track-down people. Unfortunately, its usefulness is limited if the subject person lives outside the U.S.A..

When searching people outside the US, I turn to WebMii. This has data sets for specific countries which you can select or you can select all by selecting ‘International’  as the region.

You may also search by keywords to get a list of people associated with the keywords. However, this has never worked for anything I have searched. Searching by company or brand name often returns useful results, but selecting a region failed to change the results in any search that I have done.

What was the Weather Like?

Wolfram Alpha is an interesting answer engine. It answers questions by computing the answer from curated, structured data, rather than providing a list of web pages that contain the search words like normal search engines.

Investigations often hinge on local conditions such as weather. When I need to estimate the weather conditions or compare someone’s description of the weather to actual conditions, I type in a search term like “what was the weather in toronto on july 1, 1967”. Sometimes, Wolfram Alpha has no data from which to formulate an answer such as happened with this search. If you substitute the years 1950 or 2000 you get answers, but not for 1967.

Of course I verify what I get from Wolfram Alpha through official sources.