Jamming Remote Controls

The range of issues I get involved in always amazes me. I recently had a client ask me for solutions to garage door and gate remote jammers. Jammers are simple devices that transmit enough radio frequency noise to prevent a legitimate signal from activating the garage door or gate. These remote systems operate in the 300Mhz to 400Mhz range.

It seems an executive was car jacked when his gate remote didn’t work. He got out to unlock the gate manually and his car was stolen. The police speculated that the thief used a radio jammer to prevent the gate opening.

Research into solutions for this led me to jammers for car remotes. Most of these operate in the ranges of 433Mhz, 315Mhz, and 868Mhz.

No practical technical solution exists for this type of attack. My solution was to eliminate the gate and garage door remotes in favour of more advanced access control systems. The car remote is something else. Training people to stop using them is going to be a difficult task, but it may be necessary in some threat environments.

The car remote being jammed may expose the user to robbery, assassination, or abduction due to a delay while trying to open the car door. Worse, if the user doesn’t check if the door is locked after using the remote, then an explosive device could be planted in their vehicle and commanded to explode near a high-value target.

The best solution for this problem is a thorough understanding of the user’s threat environment.

Security & Shortened URLs

As we all know, clicking on a link can send us to digital purgatory. While I don’t worry about this when I am working in a VM, I do in a normal browsing session. This hunter doesn’t want to become the hunted.

The best advice, for general browsing, is to use the WOT browser pluggin available for Firefox and Chrome. This will deal with most problem links. While in a VM, I sometimes now do a manual scan of shortened URLs using VirusTotal.

A trusted collegue tells me, “the bad actors are beginning to step up their game now, some actually check the useragent string from the browser and will redirect you to malware and fool the link scanners.”

VPN Security & Firefox

When you’re hunting in the digital landscape, you don’t want to stand out like a white lion on the Serengeti.

PeerConnections are enabled by default in Firefox. This is a bad juju for me as enabling this can leak my IP address when using a VPN connection.

In Firefox, go to ‘about:config’ in the address bar. In the config window search for this setting and change it as follows:

  • media.peerconnection.enabled and doubleclick it to change the value to false.

As this is such bad juju, I check this to make sure it is set at false before I start any research project. Of course, I do this because I always use a VPN.

The Mac & Malware

Like many Mac users, I’m not too concerned about malware. Traditionally, the vast majority of these were directed at Microsoft OS platforms. But recent headlines prompted me to consider two pieces of Mac software: Avast Mac Security and Malwarebytes for Mac.

Malwarebytes seems particularily useful if you download software from questionable sources. I’m still not certain AV software is really needed.

Disabling the WIN 10 Upgrade Nagging

In June 2016, this nagging became much more intrusive. MS began squatting on your machine with the Win 10 install files. They then began installing Win 10 without warning on unsuspecting users.

Given the privacy and security concerns with Win 10, you may not  want to be nagged to update, here’s how to stop the Windows 10 upgrade notifications and run Windows 7 or 8 forever.

There are a few methods which worked in the past but no longer stop the nagging and surreptitious install of Win 10. Never10 is the current tool that most easily disables the upgrade.

Windows 10 as Spyware

Current users of Windows 7 or 8 have been offered free upgrades to Windows 10. This would be tempting except for the liability that this may create. As we all know, there is no such thing as a free lunch.

Many experts deem lots of the new so-called features to be spyware. It is one thing to find an application misbehaving; it is entirely different to use an OS designed to allow Microsoft (MS) to monetize your data and squat on your computer hard drive. Built into the Windows 10 OS are spying and data-mining features that deliver data to MS which MS then uses to generate profits.

The long-winded Microsoft Services Agreement runs to 40,000 words of impenetrable legalese and you must agree to everything in it to get your new OS. Unfortunately, or is it predictably, the agreement appears to grant Microsoft the right to read, save, and share anything stored on or accessed using any computer running MS Windows as well as any computer using MS products or services. By default, all of this snooping is turned on and I have serious concerns that it may be impossible to entirely prevent this snooping.

Portions of Microsoft’s privacy policy, which is part of the services agreement, indicates that the MS may use a keylogger to collect users’ data. This means, if you open a file and type, MS has access to what you type, and the file containing the what you type. This may also apply to voice information from speech processing software. Of course, MS offers a way to shut-off all this logging, but you have to believe that it actually works and stays off.

If you are careful in planning your upgrade to Windows 10, and if you have the technical knowledge, then you can probably upgrade the OS while preserving your professional obligation to protect client confidentiality and privacy, at least initially.

To maintain privacy and confidentiality you should use Microsoft’s Media Creation tool. This gives you a copy of the OS installation files. You’ll need at least a 6 GB USB drive. You can use it on multiple PCs. During an upgrade, the installation will look to see if you already have a product key. To do a clean install you may need to have your Windows 7 or 8 product key. You should tape it on your PC. Keep the USB since there’s no other way to get back to Windows 10 if anything unexpected happens. Doing the installation otherwise may allow MS to scrape data from your computer.

By clicking on “Express Settings” during installation you give away your contacts, calendar details, text and touch input, location data, and a whole lot more. It is clear that MS wants to monetize the confidential information on your computer. This creates a serious liability for Canadian private investigators who maintain personal identifiers and other confidential information on Windows 10 machines. Under Canada’s Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PEPIDA), by accepting the terms of the Microsoft Services Agreement you have chosen to share this information and in most cases that may be illegal. Accepting this agreement may also put private investigators in contravention of their licencing statutes.

If you click on the small “Customise settings” button at installation, you must toggle many settings on two pages to ‘off’. Don’t forget to include Wi-Fi Sense. Using the Privacy App to turn-off the data stream to MS for those who have already installed the OS using “Express Settings” will be even more confusing to the average user. After doing all the above, Windows 10 continues to send confidential data to MS unless you dig into the registry and group policy editor. Stopping the snooping will disable many features like the digital assistant Cortana that MS is marketing as a reason to upgrade to Windows 10. However, what I am describing here only describes what we can see. Without conducting packet-level analysis, we you don’t really know what data is being sent back to Microsoft, and by which service.

You will also need to go into Windows Firewall and turn-off the rules that allowed a whole slew of Microsoft applications to transmit information.

Windows 10 Home comes with full-disk BitLocker encryption. To enable it, you must use a Microsoft account and the recovery key needed to decrypt your drive resides on Microsoft’s servers. Doing this violates your professional obligations. However, Windows 10 Pro doesn’t have this restriction: you can use BitLocker with a local account and keep your key out of the cloud. Most investigators would use Windows 10 Home and theoretically, a third party could decrypt their drives remotely.

The data stream from your PC to MS is bad enough, but somebody will learn to intercept this data stream and this will leave you open to a targeted attack. If the hacker releases the stolen data and it is tracked back to you or your computer, then your career is likely over. You can expect some form of action under PEPIDA and/or prosecution under your licencing statute. This data breach will almost certainly result in a civil suit and adverse publicity. Who would hire a PI or researcher like that?

Another concern is how updates are delivered. Like Bittorrent, Win 10 updates will be distributed from other Win 10 PCs  This presents an extreme risk, as you don’t know where the update is really coming from. You have to know enough to choose how your updates are delivered.

Privacy & the PI

Let’s address this situation realistically from the perspective of the PI or researcher determined to use Windows 10.

Let’s assume that you are a trusting individual. You trust MS government officials, litigants, lawyers, and everybody else to not understand or care that you accepted the Microsoft Service agreement that grants MS access to all your confidential data and the right to save and share it. You must also trust that your own technical expertise is up to the task of properly installing Windows 10 to circumvent all the efforts of MS to access your data.

At the outset, you pay extra for the Pro version to set-up disk encryption with a local account because you are security conscious.

First, you try to install the OS without it being connected to the Internet to ensure it doesn’t scrape data from your PC. This doesn’t work, as it needs connectivity to complete the installation. You discover that you must use the clean install method (using Microsoft’s Media Creation tool) described above to isolate your PC from the Internet to ensure that MS doesn’t scrape data from you computer during the installation. There are reports of Win 10 install files being placed on your computer on Patch Tuesday to use your PC to further distribute the OS installation files. You must learn how to get your patches from only a trusted source and to prevent MS from using your PC to distribute the OS.

Second, upon ensuring that it will not scrape data from your PC during installation, you toggle two pages of settings to ‘off’ and lose many of the new features.

Third, you edit registry and group policies to staunch the continuing flow of data to MS. Doesn’t everybody know how to do this without damaging the usability of the OS?

Fourth, in Windows Firewall, you turn-off the rules that allow MS applications to transmit information to MS.

Fifth, you then choose how your updates are delivered to prevent updates from untrusted sites. You ensure that updates come from trusted computers in your own network.

Sixth, you conduct packet-level analysis and shut-off any service that continues to send data to MS. Doesn’t everybody know how to do this and have the time to do it?

Finally, with every update and patch, you do a packet-level analysis to make sure your privacy and security is intact.

Of course, sending all this private and confidential data to MS is not necessary to have a functioning OS and applications. It is only necessary for MS profits and probably some government snooping.

Next, how to stop the Win 10 install nagging.

JonDo

For anonymous web surfing, at a minimum, two components are required: a proxy and a browser that doesn’t identify you. At the office, I have both and much more to protect my privacy and provide anonymity. If I have to use a Windows computer at a client’s offices, then temporary measures have to be undertaken.

The simplest solution for this, without using an anonymous VPN, is the JonDo Proxy program that will hide your IP address (Java application) and JonDoFox, a Firefox profile optimized for anonymous and secure web surfing. Using the USB doesn’t leave any traces on the computer for some snoop at the client’s office to uncover. This need Windows as the OS.

For more privacy and anonymity, you can use JonDo/Tor-Secure-Live-DVD, a secure, pre-configured environment for anonymous surfing and more. This has its own OS based on the Debian GNU/Linux OS. The live system contains proxy clients for JonDonym, Tor Onion Router and Mixmaster remailer and much more.

The advantage of the live system is that it is on a DVD, which prevents any other system from writing something dangerous to the DVD.

Using these do not make it impossible to uncover individual users, as there is no such thing as a 100% security, but for most users, this will be adequate for most situations. If you are concerned about this, I suggest you read the surveillance reports on the law enforcement page.

Operational Security Part 5: Online Personas

In this 6 part series of articles for Canadian Security Magazine, part 1 explained the nature of security intelligence (SI) and its OPSEC challenges. Part 2 explained the OPSEC challenges facing security intelligence in an iconic commercial enterprise or location. Part 3 explained the important aspects of document control. Part 4 explained the best way to protect the computer network used for security intelligence.

This, the 5th part, explains that privacy and anonymity are different things entirely and how to manage the use of online personas to gather intelligence.

Privacy Settings for Firefox–Tracking

Firefox is the best browser for protecting your data. However, Firefox does require several setting adjustments to avoid intrusive tactics like ad tracking.

Select Options and then Privacy in the left hand navigation panel.

By default, Firefox does not enable the do-not-track feature. Turn it on by selecting “Request that sites not track you.” Also select “Use Tracking Protection in Private Windows”, which enables tracking protection that blocks ads and other online trackers when you’re in private browsing mode. However, few sites honor this request.

To enforce your do-not-track intentions, you need to use an add-on such as Ghostery, Disconnect, or the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s Privacy Badger. We have found that some sites do not to allow access to content with add-ons like these enabled.

Finding a Secure Workspace

Recently, when working at a client sites, I’ve taken to occasionally using Windows to Go. This is Microsoft’s little-used secure workspace feature for Windows. It allows you to boot into a secure workspace located entirely on a USB key. This enables you to use Windows without relying on the operating system, applications, or storage on the host device. It creates a secure workspace on any machine that can boot from a USB drive without trusting the host machine. I have even devised a way to use a Virtual Machine (VM) in this workspace. Because the workspace doesn’t rely on the host operating system, the workspace on the USB drive isn’t at risk of compromise from a host machine and the VM protects the USB workspace. This saves me from constant use of my ‘Safe Mode on steroids’ or reinstalling Windows from a drive image on a client’s machine. However, it is too slow and requires too much effort to maintain. A similar live Linux USB seems to offer faster performance and it is easier to maintain the VM.

Defence Against the Dark Arts

I wander through the nether regions of the Internet and Dark Net looking for data to support my clients’ causes. This exposes me to severe risks from the nasty creativity of Beelzebub’s demonic gangsters and hackers.

It seems that a Windows system only lasts about 1/2 hour before getting infected without some form of anti-virus (AV). I regularly boot a clean live Linux USB, and then scan for viruses. This is like Safe Mode on steroids. In most instances, I find something malicious missed by the typical AV programs. However, this is only a temporary measure.

I am migrating to Linux for Investigative Internet Research because very little Linux malware exists in the wild. I only need AV on the Linux file server (or an email server if I had one). I do this because an infected Windows computer may upload infected files or an uninfected one might access infected files on the Linux machine, which then allows it to infect other Windows systems. AV on the file server isn’t protecting the Linux system–it’s protecting the Windows computers from themselves. I recommend the paid version of ESET Antivirus and Security Software as it doesn’t try to upsell you on other services.

OPSEC & Social Network Sites

OPSEC

An investigator can use LinkedIn, Facebook, and other sites to build a profile of someone’s personal and work life, but like so many things in life, this is both good and bad. What might happen if it is done to your business’s employees? How might this hurt your company? Most businesses do not think about this and if they do, they usually consider key executives to be most at risk. This is entirely wrong!

Operational security (OPSEC) is the lens through which to view this risk. View each employee in terms of what he knows and to what he has access. This will change your entire outlook.

The janitor has keys and is in the building alone. Security guards possess sensitive information. The secretary to the VP of Marketing knows when you will launch a new product. Are you starting to get the picture? This leaves the problem of how to analyse the content of sites like LinkedIn and Facebook.

Facebook

For example, Facebook identifies your friends and family, and where they live. It knows your likes and dislikes. It knows your travel destinations. It knows posting habits and posts to which you will respond. All of this creates an OPSEC nightmare.

The Wolfram Alpha Facebook Report lets you see what information Facebook knows about you and your friends. It yields easy-to-understand charts, tables, and graphs in a personalized report.

This needs the account holder to log into Facebook before it will run, however, this will not stop an industrial spy, foreign agent, gangster, or terrorist. In certain dark corners of the Internet, hacking a social media account will cost about $350. Changing the privacy settings is a meagre deterrent. With the hacked account and the Wolfram Alpha Facebook Report, the crook or spy has everything he needs to plan the compromise of an employee.

LinkedIn & Spies

Using LinkedIn, researchers found the personal details of 27,000 intelligence officers that the researchers say are working on surveillance programs. They compiled the records into the ICWatch database, which is searchable by company, title, name, and location.

What might a skilled researcher find regarding your employees?

Solutions

The biggest part of dealing with this OPSEC risk is recognising that it exists. The rest of the solution involves a combination of strict social media policies, non-disclosure agreements, conditions of employment, and employment contracts coupled with employee indoctrination and training.