Veracity of Online Images & Video

My mother advised me not to believe everything I read remains true today as it was 50 years ago. Today, this advice extends to online video and images.

Hoax imagery and video abounds online. A fake video of an eagle trying to fly off with an infant in a Montreal park is only one example. Students at the National Animation and Design Centre created this ‘Golden Eagle Snatches Kid’ video. Their skill was impressive. It took a frame-by-frame analysis to uncover the fake. Frames that lacked the eagle’s shadow revealed it to be a hoax.

Free editing software like VLC Media Player or Avidemux Video Editor can help split video into frames, but locating and investigating the person who posted the video proves more productive in most cases. The following is a short outline of how I approach this problem.

First, start listing the places you find the item and user names that posted it. Look for the first instance of the item by filtering by date. Try to find the first instance as this may be the original and the original poster of the item. Compare video thumbnails to find the earliest and largest as that may be the original. Search the thumbnails in Google Image Search, TinEye, and Bing. However, searching TinEye, et al, will require an image with high contrast and distinctive colour combinations.

Next, try to identify the person who first posted it. Sometimes, discovering the creator of the item is easy because it was posted on a Facebook page or on YouTube, but usually it was just duplicated there and originates elsewhere. Search all text associated with the item—tags, descriptions, user names. Use everything as search terms. Search all the user names to identify the people. Use sites to LinkedIn, Facebook, etc., to get a feel for the background of the people you may later contact.

Once you have found the likely source of the item, examine and question the source to establish his reliability. You need to engage this person to establish that he created the video or image and that it isn’t a hoax or an altered version of something he still possesses.

1 Response to “Veracity of Online Images & Video”


  • Good stuff, especially with all the pix coming out of places like Ukraine et. al.

    Another good resource along these lines (although a bit broader – including more than just images – as well as a bit narrower – confirmation during emergencies) is the Verification Handbook (http://verificationhandbook.com/).

    Keep up the great work sharing!

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