Windows Error Reporting Risk

Windows Error Reporting (WER) is a crash reporting technology introduced by Microsoft with Windows XP. However, we now know that it may send Microsoft unencrypted personally identifiable information contained in the memory and application data that may make you vulnerable to attack. WER is turned on by default. WER from Windows 8 may now use TLS encryption.

The Snowdon leaks described how the U.S. National Security Agency intercepts the unencrypted WER logs to fingerprint machines like some malware to identify potential system, network and application weaknesses to execute attacks that move through an enterprise network. WER reports on more than Windows crashes. It reports hardware changes, such as the first-time use of a new USB device and mobile devices. It sends time-stamp data, device manufacturer, identifier and revision, along with host computer information such as default language, operating system service pack and update version, hardware manufacturer, model and name, as well as BIOS version and unique machine identifier. This creates a blueprint of the applications running on a network to help an attacker develop or execute attacks with little chance of detection.

This is only one example of the OS, applications, browsers, etc. leaking information that the investigator must be aware of when conducting investigative internet research.

To shut-off WER in Windows 7 go to Control Panel>System and Security>Action Center>Change Action Center settings>Related settings>Problem reporting settings. The selections for “Each time a problem occurs, ask me before checking for solutions” and “Never check for solutions” disable WER. Choosing Never check for solutions will fully disable error reporting in Windows 7.