Handwriting and the Ability to Compose Ideas

How Handwriting Trains the Brain

Forming Letters Is Key to Learning, Memory, Ideas

Wendy Bounds discusses the fading art of handwriting, pointing out that new research shows it can benefit children’s motor skills and their ability to compose ideas and achieve goals throughout life.

The most interesting part of the article involves the ramifications of poor handwriting in test scores.

Even legible handwriting that’s messy can have its own ramifications, says Steve Graham, professor of education at Vanderbilt University. He cites several studies indicating that good handwriting can take a generic classroom test score from the 50th percentile to the 84th percentile, while bad penmanship could tank it to the 16th. “There is a reader effect that is insidious,” Dr. Graham says. “People judge the quality of your ideas based on your handwriting.”

As an Investigator, the reader effect may affect how judges and juries view your competence and creditability.

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